READINGS 

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INAF 6209 E-GOVERNMENT & DIGITAL DIPLOMACY 

CLASS #1: Introduction and overview

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CLASS #2: Tools of the trade

O’Reilly, T. (2010). “Government as a platform” (Chapter 2, pp. 11-39) Open Government, O’Reilly Media.

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** Habermas, J. (1962/1989). The structural transformation of the public sphere (Chapter 2, “Social structures of the public sphere, pp. 27-56. Chapter 3, “Political functions of the public sphere,” pp. 57-88). Cambridge: MIT Press.

 

Observatory of Public Sector Innovation (OPSI): Embracing Innovation in Government – Global Trends 2019

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CLASS #3: Changed information-sharing culture

** Dizard, Jr., W. (2001). Digital diplomacy: US foreign policy in the information age (Chapter 1, “Foreign policy in the information age,” pp.17). Washington, DC: Center for Strategic and International Studies.

Postmes, T., Spears, R., & Lea, M. (1998). Breaching or building social boundaries? SIDE-effects of computer-mediated communication. Communication research, 25(6), 689-715.

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Wichowski (2017). "Hack the bureaucracy: a user's guide to getting things done in government (with or without tech)." 

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CLASS #4: Openness & the challenges of “need to know” vs “need to share”

Noveck, B. (2010) “The single point of failure.” (Chapter 4, pp.49-69) Open Government, O’Reilly Media

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Wichowski, A. (2015). “‘Secrecy is for losers’: why diplomats should embrace openness to protect national security” In M. Holmes & C. Bjola (Eds.) Digital Diplomacy, Theory & Practice. London: Routledge.  

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Fenster, M. (2011-2012). “Disclosure's Effects: WikiLeaks and Transparency,” 97 Iowa L. Rev. 753

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CLASS #5: Digitizing diplomatic communications

Dizard, Jr., W. (2001). Digital diplomacy: US foreign policy in the information age (Chapter 2, “The origins of digital diplomacy,” pp19-26; Chapter 6, “Restructuring diplomatic communications,” pp.100-111). Washington, DC: Center for Strategic and International Studies.

 

US Department of State, (2011). 21st century statecraft.

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Shirky, C. (2011). The political power of social media. Foreign Affairs, January/February (2011),

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Gladwell, M. (2011) From Innovation to Revolution: Do Social Media Make Protests Possible?, Foreign Affairs 

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Gates, B. (1996). Content is king.

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CLASS #6: Twitter in the Age of Trump

Fletcher, T. (2016). Naked Diplomacy: Power and Statecraft in the Digital Age (Ch5, 6)

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Wichowski, A. “Social diplomacy, or how diplomats learned to stop worrying and love the tweet.” Foreign Affairs

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Olubukola S. Adesina (2016), “Foreign policy in an era of digital diplomacy” Cogent Social Sciences

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CLASS #7: Open government & citizens’ “rights”

Universal Declaration of Human Rights

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Weinstein, J. & Goldstein, (2012) “The benefits of a big tent: opening up government in developing countries.” UCLA Law Review, 60 UCLA L. Rev. Disc. 38

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Yu, H. & Robinson, D. (2012) “The new ambiguity of ‘open government” UCLA Law Review, 59 UCLA L. REV. DISC. 178

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CLASS #8: Talking points Q&A

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CLASS #9: Evidence-based governance, accountability, transparency and big data

** Sunstein, C (2013). Simpler: The Future of Government. Simon & Schuster, New York.  (Chapter 2-3)

Human Rights Initiative (nd), “The Right to Information - Ghana's Journey”

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(2011) World Bank, Accountability through public opinion: from inertia to public action, Ch7 “Necessary conditions for increasing accountability,”

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CLASS #10: City, state, country, kings: options per tier

Dawes, S., Cresswell, A., & Pardo, T. (2009). From “need to know” to “need to share”: Tangled problems, information boundaries, and the building of public sector knowledge networks. Public Administration Review, 69(3), 392-402.

Putnam, J. (2016). “The tech geeks burden,” TechCrunch.
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Navarria, G. (2014). “Can democracy survive the rise of of tools democratic, autocratic surveillance technology?” Democratic Theory, Volume 1, 02.25.16 governments use of Number 2, pgs. 78-84

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CLASS #11: Guest speakers

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